Malley Industries Transit Type II Ambulance

img_6234Global Emergency Vehicles is proud to have received the first Malley Industries Type II Ambulance on the Ford Transit chassis. This vehicle has been built to be lighter and more ergonomically sound than traditional Type II units.

The lightweight conversion will allow for better fuel economy and less wear and tear on replaceable chassis parts. This vehicle also boasts a payload of 2500lbs on the T250 on the 3000lbs on the T350.

The set-up of the vehicle allows easy access to medical equipment, lighting controls, and AC system while remaining safely seated. In the cab there is increased room with a full seat recline option for added comfort. These units also allow a choice of a squad bench or a single-person swivel seat and paramedic work station.

The unique contoured interior walls add 2″ of aisle width over traditional straight wall construction. The walls are energy-absorbent, flexible, and have rounded corners which are less likely to cause injury in the event of a collision. Fewer seams than traditional wood, mica, or aluminum interiors make it easy to sanitize. The bright interior enhances lighting to perform medical procedures.

These vehicle have been Tested and Certified to meet the highest level of Ambulance standards including KKK-A-1822 certifications.  Between the innovative design and aggressive price point these Type II options are a great value.

For additional information or questions, please contact Global Emergency Vehicles toll free at 855 547-9111 or sales@gevusa.com.

History of the Star of Life

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STAR OF LIFE

 

The Star of Life was designed by Leo R. Schwartz, who was Chief of the EMS Branch of the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. In 1973, the American Red Cross complained to the NHTSA that the use of the common Omaha Orange Cross on a square background of reflectorized white closely resembled the Red Cross symbol. Once the NHTSA investigated and agreed with the complaint, the new Blue Star of Life (displayed above) was born.

 

This new symbol was designed using the Medical Identification Symbol as a guide. The Star of Life was registered as a certification mark with the Commissioner of Patents and Trademarks on February 1, 1977.

 

The center of the star consists of the snake and staff. The staff is named Asclepius, who according to Greek mythology, was the son of Apollo. Theory states Asclepius learned the art of healing from the centaur Cheron.. Asclepius was usually shown in a standing position with a long cloak and holding a staff with a serpent coiled around it. This is why the staff is the long-standing symbol representing medicine.  In the Physicians and Military Medical Corp, the Caduceus is used. The Caduceus is a winged staff with two serpents intertwined around it.

 

The six points of the Star of Life Symbol are meant to represent the true meaning of the EMS System. These include Detection, Reporting, Response, On Scene Care, Care in Transit, and Transfer to Definitive Care.

 

The use of the Star of Life Symbol is regulated and monitored by the NHTSA