Drivers Move Over to Promote Emergency Vehicle Safety

This is a Move Over Sign

Obey the law and Move Over

 

We have all driven up to a scene where we encounter the flashing lights of an emergency vehicle on the side of the road. Most of us, out of habit or courtesy, know to move over and slow down to ensure the safety of the emergency vehicle responder. Unfortunately, not all drivers are considerate so each state has passed their own “Move Over” laws to promote emergency vehicle safety.

Move Over laws began to pop up in the United States between 2000 and 2012 but originated in the mid 1990′s. In 1994, a paramedic in Lexington, South Carolina was struck and injured when responding to a call. To make matters worse, he was actually ticketed as “at fault” for the accident. To ensure the safety of emergency vehicle workers and protect them from liability, South Carolina passed the first form of the law in 1996. The law was later revised in 2002 to it’s current format.

Between 2000 and 2012 Move Over laws were passed in all 50 states, only Washington DC is without a regulation. Move Over laws are primarily focused on ensuring the safety of emergency responders on the side of the road. Most of the laws require passing vehicles to vacate the lane closest to the shoulder where the emergency vehicle is located. In addition to clearing the lane, many states have a provision that drivers must reduce their speed as well. Apparently not everybody is receiving this message as Hawaii, who just passed their law in 2012, wrote 60 citations in conjunction with recent DUI stops.

Since each state is responsible for their own laws the punishments can vary. Wisconsin allows for fines over $ 260 and 3 demerits against their license. In Nevada, the fines can reach $ 395 and 4 points assigned to their license. Both West Virginia and South Dakota have provisions that call for monetary fines and even jail time!

Move Over laws are in place to promote emergency vehicle safety for everyone involved. Help out the people who dedicate their lives to helping others and follow the law.

What has been your experience with Move Over laws?

Demers Ambulance

Demers Ambulances: New Ambulances with Lower Operational Costs Provide Greater Value

Whether you are a member of a volunteer rescue squad or a private ambulance company, chances are two things that are important to your organization  are helping those in need and being financially sound when doing so. The first part of this statement is usually what draws folks into this line of work, the second part is what allows them to stay in it and even prosper. One of the largest investments made by these organizations would be their emergency vehicles.

Global Emergency Vehicles understands this and that is why they were built on the principle of providing quality used emergency vehicles at fair prices. One way that GEV ensures that they deliver value is through their 125-point inspection and refurbishing plans. Another way that they can ensure quality refurbished vehicles is to select vehicles that were originally built by quality manufacturers. Demers Ambulance is a new ambulance manufacturer based in Canada that builds their ambulances with quality and lower operational costs in mind.

Demers has built and delivered 15,000 ambulances over the past 50 years, but this family influenced company began building custom “ambulance and hearse” buggies back in 1892. By the 1960′s they were building an ambulance using a station wagon base that had the roof replaced with a steel top and the body actually cut and lengthened. By the early 1970′s they had begun production on their first van ambulance. The mid – 1970′s started an expansion into Latin America and by the end of the decade they had also delivered more than 1600 ambulances to the Middle East. By 2000 they had entered the US market with products that exceeded KKK-A-1812 standards. Today they employ over 150 people and maintain a 54,000 square foot headquarters and production facility that produces 1500 units annually.

To ensure that they build well reviewed and functional ambulances, Demers has used paramedics input into the designing of their vehicles. Demers uses a Continuous Flow Process assembly line to build their vehicles. There are sixteen separate stations that the vehicle moves through as it is being built. At the end of each stage there is a Quality and Assurance check to ensure compliance. If an issue is discovered they can return to the last stage that had been successfully completed and then correct the issues at hand. With this process in place Demers can build 30 ambulances per week. More importantly, a standardized process means better overall quality.

Demers believes that their value is increased through lower operational costs when using their vehicles. Since the new ambulances are built with quality parts and a proven design, the overall satisfaction with the ambulance is quite high.¬† Another way that Demers can add to the value of their product is through their safety features. Safety features allow the attendants to perform the necessary tasks without risking their own well-being. If an attendant is injured and is unable to work for an organization they will be negatively affected in many different ways. Avoiding these problems are important to remaining financially sound. Some of the innovations that they have introduced are rounded corners and cabinetry that is made from shatter-proof materials. They have developed their Track Mobility System Seating that allows for the Attendant’s seat to roll on¬† track from one end of the workstation to the other, eliminating the need to get up (unsecured) and move back and forth. Not only does this feature allow for the seat to move from front to back, it also provides a 180 degree turn. This allows the attendant to perform all of the necessary tasks while securely fastened in their seat. Finally the auxiliary console is set up to be ergonomically sound and allows the attendant to control many vehicle features from a central location.

Not only is Demers concerned with producing quality vehicles that promote user safety, the also strive to produce the most fuel efficient vehicles in the market. Demers quest for better fuel efficiency actually started well before the recent gas crisis that have caused record prices. Demers actually began addressing this problem back in the 1990′s when they replaced many parts with durable and lighter options. One of the first such changes was eliminating the use of wooden cabinets and moving toward aluminum alternatives. This allowed the company to produce a lighter vehicle with a lower center of gravity which increased steering control and helped prevent the rolling of the unit. Producing a lighter unit also extends the life of other parts on the vehicle like brakes and tires. Demers Type II ambulances have an aero dynamic build that produces up to a 12% increase in fuel economy. The design duplicated on a Type III ambulance resulted in a 3% increase in fuel efficiency. Lastly, the Anti-Idling System features a monitor that tracks battery voltage and rear compartment temperatures. Once it reaches certain thresholds the system will shut down the engine but continue to monitor the outputs. If necessary, the engine would restart and the process would repeat itself. Tests show that this alone can reduce fuel consumption by 40% during idle time, which translates to thousands of dollars annually.

Demers has been building quality ambulances for quite some time and their focus is delivering value after the sale by providing lower operational costs. Global Emergency Vehicles delivers value by thoroughly inspecting and refurbishing the emergency vehicles they sell. To ensure that you are getting the best value for your budget dollars, why not try a GEV refurbished Demers ambulance?

Take a look at Demers ambulances currently in the GEV Inventory here.