GEV Becomes an HME/Ahrens-Fox Fire Apparatus Dealer for Central and Eastern Pennsylvania

HME 51-ft Tower Aerial Fire Apparatus - Ladder - QuintGEV is proud to announce its appointment as an authorized dealer and a service center for HME / Ahrens-Fox Fire Apparatus in Eastern and Central PA. GEV will offer a wide wide variety of HME fire apparatus – from mini-pumpers to ladder and platform trucks. According to GEV President, Vitaly Samsonov, “We are really thrilled to represent such a respected brand of fire apparatus in our home state. HME builds amazing fire trucks and they are always looking to improve their designs and add features that are innovative and improve the safety of the operator.”

HME Ahrens-Fox reputation is built on experience, innovation and a drive to produce the best apparatus available in the industry the today. Through total vertical integration of the design, engineering and manufacturing capabilities, HME Ahrens-Fox has the capability to immediately integrate the latest technologies and innovations in advanced engineering.

New Market Volunteer Fire Department Takes Delivery of Remounted Ambulance

Global Emergency Vehicles is proud to announce the delivery of a 2017 Ford F450 XLT 4×4 Remounted Type I Ambulance to New Market Volunteer Fire Department in New Market, MD. GEV built this ambulance by remounting a Horton Patient Module onto the brand new 2017 Ford Chassis and is covered by multiple warranties, including a 6YR / 100,000 Mile Electrical Warranty. By purchasing a Remounted Ambulance the Department was able to include several upgrades including a Whelen Dominator Light Bar and still come in well below the cost for a new unit from a manufacturer. Please join us in congratulating New Market Volunteer Fire Department on their new purchase!New Market Final Lettering and Striping

Decontaminating and Cleaning an Ambulance

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As a society we are always trying to improve the level of health care that we can provide. Researchers develop new medicines and surgeons develop new techniques to improve our overall quality of life. One of the advancements that have allowed us more freedom in where we live is the ambulance.  Not only does an ambulance transport people to medical centers, it also allows for medical care to be administered while en route. This requires the ambulance to be clean and decontaminated to ensure a patient is not exposed to any additional threats. The following steps should be taken to ensure that your ambulance is both in compliance with Federal and State guidelines and you are providing the highest level of care to your patients.

For the exterior of the ambulance make certain that the windshield is free of bugs or debris and the mirrors are wiped down with a glass cleaner. It is important that the driver has clear sight lines and ability to use the mirrors effectively. Washing the body of the ambulance will remove any dirt or grime and will project a professional image throughout the community. Wash the exterior with soap and water using sponges or brushes to cover the entire body. Make sure that the tires are free of mud and dirt. If they need to be cleaned, spray a cleaner / degreaser on the tires and scrub with a brush and spray off with clean water. You should wash the tires each time the body of the ambulance is washed.

Inside the cab of the ambulance you want to make sure that after each use that you vacuum out the seats and floor. If the flooring is not carpeted then wipe them out with a cleaner / degreaser. Make sure that all used gloves, soda cans, or trash are removed from the console or door compartments. Wipe down the console and dashboard with a disinfectant. Do not spray the disinfectant directly on the dashboard, console, radio, or any other electronic equipment. Instead spray directly on the rag and then wipe down the areas. Pay particular attention to steering wheel, door handles, and radio microphone due to the amount and kind of use they get.

The Patient Module requires cleaning to be done on the Ambulance itself, along with much of the equipment that is used. Making sure that the stretcher is clean and the linens are changed after each use is very important. No patient should ever be placed on used linens. Make sure that the stretcher and stretcher straps are cleaned after each use. Remove the mattress from the frame and thoroughly clean it with a disinfectant. Wipe down the handrails and the frame of the cot even the under carriage. In the Patient Module itself, make sure that you wipe down all surface areas.  Do not spray the disinfectant directly on the surface area and make sure that you completely wipe off any excess spray. Make sure that you wipe down all of the door handles and handles to the cabinets. Clean the plexi-glass doors with glass cleaner not disinfectant. Check the Sharps container and trash bins to make sure they are not close to capacity. If your Sharps container is close to being full make sure that you change it on your next visit to the hospital. Finally, sweep and decontaminate the floor. After sweeping out any dirt or debris, spray the floor with disinfectant and let it sit for a few minutes and then mop with clean water.

There are also several other areas or equipment that need regular cleaning. On the Monitor/Defibrillator make sure that you wipe down the lead cables, the pulse ox probe and the face of the monitor. Clean out the Oxygen caddy and wipe down the regulator. Back boards and head blocks also need to be wiped down. When picking up or restocking immobilization equipment from the hospital make sure that they are properly cleaned, especially the grab rails, before placing them back in the ambulance. Wipe down the stethoscope ear pieces and bell and lightly spray the BP cuff. Make sure that the BP cuff is dry before placing it back into the jump bag. If any other equipment was used make sure that it is properly cleaned and stored for the next use.

By following the above steps you will be ensuring that your unit meets Federal and State guidelines. In addition, you will be presenting a professional image to the people of your community that you serve.

Ram ProMaster Crossover Type II Ambulance

Global Emergency Vehicles is proud to offer the Ram ProMaster Crossover Type II built by Malley Industries. This Ambulance offers various configurations and has lots of great features.

The Malley ProMaster Crossover Type II can be used with a Squad Bench with enough room to hold a Bariatric Stretcher. It can also have a Squad Bench with a “Grab and Go” Shelving unit that allows for easy access to up to four adjustable shelves. The third configuration allows for a Safety Seat that swivels to allow attendants to face forward, the patient, or at 45 degrees for optimal safety and patient care.

The Malley ProMaster Crossover Type II has the lowest floor height at only 22 inches and the tallest headroom at 73 inches. Unlike most ambulances, this vehicle has Front Wheel Drive which enhances traction in mud or snow compared to traditional Rear Wheel Drive units. These Type II ambulances have a very high payload (2100 -2400lbs depending on configuration) and are bariatric capable.

As the first to manufacture a state-of-the-art ambulance on a Ram ProMaster chassis, Malley has achieved significant improvements over traditional Type II’s. Some of the improvements achieved are a significantly larger workspace for paramedics to provide pre-hospital care. The configuration allows for better access to compartments and equipment while attendants are safely seated. Having the lowest floor height in it’s class reduces paramedic back strain from loading and unloading patients.The walls and shelving are made of antimicrobial ABS plastics which helps maintain sterilization. The ABS walls are flexible and energy-absorbent which are less likely to cause injury in the event of a collision. Finally, the cab design provides more comfortable and functional space for paramedics including full seat movement and recline with storage for personal equipment.

Global Emergency Vehicles is excited to offer this unique and innovative Type II Ambulance. If you are interested in more information on this vehicle give us a call at (215) 547-9111.

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Alton Fire Dept Purchases Two Ambulances From GEV

Recently the City of Alton, Illinois Fire Department began responding to Emergency Calls. The Department selected two units from the inventory here at Global Emergency Vehicles. They selected a 2009 Chevrolet C4500 Wheeled Coach and a 2012 Chevrolet C3500 McCoy Miller unit. Global Emergency Vehicles put both vehicles through our Inspection and Refurbishing process to ensure they were in fine working condition for their new owners. By choosing to go with Refurbished units over New they were able to achieve some significant savings. They invested about 1/3 the cost of similar New Units for these two Ambulances. Due to this cost savings the Department was also able include Stryker Power Load Systems and Power Stretchers with each vehicle. According to Chief Bernie Sebold, the Power Load System and Stretchers have been a very worthwhile addition to the vehicles and have been a hit with the crew. Alton MD

Remounted Ambulances Provide Great Value

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In a perfect world, all of our Emergency Service Providers would be fully staffed, trained, and equipped for all scenarios or events. However, those with insight into the industry know that this is often not the case. Sometimes, one would find not-so-well-funded squads still trying to provide the highest level of service and care for their community.

As the average price of a New Ambulance increases, the number of organizations that can comfortably purchase high-end ambulances decreases. The organizations that cannot purchase New Ambulances from the manufacturer still need to provide Emergency Medical Services to their respective communities. One solution that many squads are turning to are Remounted Ambulances. This type of an ambulance has been around for some time, but recently has been gaining wide acceptance throughout the industry. Remounted Ambulances are now being looked at as viable options for budget-conscious buyers. In fact, some agencies that have budgets that could afford purchasing new ambulances from the manufacturers are turning to Remounts to provide more value for their investment.

A Remounted Ambulance takes an existing ambulance and removes the Patient Module or “box”. The box is then remounted to a new chassis and the electrical wires are ran to the cab. By reusing the Patient Module and the compartments and shelving it contains, Remounted Ambulances can offer savings of up to 50% off new ambulance prices.

Global Emergency Vehicles offers a full Remount package that can rival new units from the manufacturer in quality, features, and warranties. You can provide GEV a Patient Module or find one in our large inventory of options. Providing GEV with your current Module allows the new unit to be identical and eliminates your crew from learning a new layout or shelving set-up. Choosing from one of GEV’s options allows you to upgrade features or overcome current obstacles. For instance, your current rig does not have a window in the Patient Module but you would like one in a new model, simply make that a criteria for your box selection.

The standard Remount process for GEV is quite extensive and we take every step to ensure a quality build and product is delivered. Once the box is removed from its current chassis all of the doors and hardware are removed. The next step is to sand, prime, and paint the box. GEV can recreate any major manufacturer’s paint color given the paint code or a sample. The paint will be backed by a warranty.

Another important aspect of the Remounted Ambulance produced by GEV is the Electrical System. The standard package includes LED lighting for both inside the module along with Emergency, Scene, and Load lighting. The vehicle will also have a brand new Electrical Control System with separate operating panels. Both the system and the lights will be backed by a 6-year warranty.

Inside the Patient Module will be outfitted with all new hardware, locks, and handles. New flooring will be laid and new seating and upholstery will be included. While in most cases, the shelving will be reused, the plexi-glass doors will all be replaced. Each unit will also come with a brand new HVAC system that will also be covered by the full warranty.

The Cab is also converted over to an Ambulance set-up, including your Emergency Lighting Controls and Siren. A custom console is built to house these controls. The Cab and Chassis is covered by the chassis manufacturer warranty and the vehicles will also include up to a 10-year engine and/or power train warranty depending on the make of the vehicle.

As more squads look at the advantages of Remounted Ambulances there will be an increase in the number of Remounted Ambulances put into service. Global Emergency Vehicles is happy to discuss with you our vehicle and any questions that you may have. To get more information on our Remounted Ambulances please visit our website www.gevusa.com or call us at 855 547-9111.

 

NHTSA Ambulance Crash Studies

Everyday EMS providers assist people with a myriad of potential issues. Some have been involved in an accident or others may be experiencing an illness or negative reaction to something causing issue. In many cases, the patient needs to be transported to a medical facility. Since this is such a common occurrence, most people do not think twice about the increased risks transporting a patient poses for both the patients and the attendants. One group who has put a lot of thought and even multiple studies into this is the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA). In particular, the NHTSA have done a study on Ambulances involved in crashes and released their findings. Recently, Neil Smith wrote an article for EMSWorld.com that outlined the NHTSA findings. Here are some of the highlights of the article.

The NHTSA looked at Ambulance accidents over the past 20 years and found that there were an average of 29 fatal crashes that resulted in an average of 33 fatalities annually. In these incidents only  25% of the fatalities occurred inside the ambulance, the rest were in the other “striking” vehicle. In addition, there are on average 1500 crashes involving ambulances with non-fatal injuries. Of these incidents, 46% of injuries occurred inside the vehicle. To help put these numbers into perspective there were 32,719 fatalities on the road in 2013 for all drivers.

The NHTSA looked at pre-crash, crash, and post-crash data and their findings were that 4 out of 5 EMS attendants were not buckled in or restrained during the crashes. In a study of 45 providers involved in crashes there were 11 instances where the driver was not even using a seat belt. Being properly belted or restrained in the patient module is not only for the safety of the EMS attendant, studies have shown that occupant to occupant contact has occurred and resulted in additional injuries to the patient, including 2 cases where the results were fatal.

On a positive note, 96% of patients were restrained when the crash occurred. While the 96% is a high percentage,  the bad news is that only 33% of these patients are restrained with lateral belts and shoulder harnesses.  Of the crashes investigated 44% of patients were ejected from their cots.

Global Emergency Vehicles is proud to offer ambulances equipped with 5 pt. harnesses and promote safety for both patient and attendant.  Contact us to discuss these and other safety options for your next ambulance.

Malley Industries Transit Type II Ambulance

img_6234Global Emergency Vehicles is proud to have received the first Malley Industries Type II Ambulance on the Ford Transit chassis. This vehicle has been built to be lighter and more ergonomically sound than traditional Type II units.

The lightweight conversion will allow for better fuel economy and less wear and tear on replaceable chassis parts. This vehicle also boasts a payload of 2500lbs on the T250 on the 3000lbs on the T350.

The set-up of the vehicle allows easy access to medical equipment, lighting controls, and AC system while remaining safely seated. In the cab there is increased room with a full seat recline option for added comfort. These units also allow a choice of a squad bench or a single-person swivel seat and paramedic work station.

The unique contoured interior walls add 2″ of aisle width over traditional straight wall construction. The walls are energy-absorbent, flexible, and have rounded corners which are less likely to cause injury in the event of a collision. Fewer seams than traditional wood, mica, or aluminum interiors make it easy to sanitize. The bright interior enhances lighting to perform medical procedures.

These vehicle have been Tested and Certified to meet the highest level of Ambulance standards including KKK-A-1822 certifications.  Between the innovative design and aggressive price point these Type II options are a great value.

For additional information or questions, please contact Global Emergency Vehicles toll free at 855 547-9111 or sales@gevusa.com.

History of the Star of Life

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STAR OF LIFE

 

The Star of Life was designed by Leo R. Schwartz, who was Chief of the EMS Branch of the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. In 1973, the American Red Cross complained to the NHTSA that the use of the common Omaha Orange Cross on a square background of reflectorized white closely resembled the Red Cross symbol. Once the NHTSA investigated and agreed with the complaint, the new Blue Star of Life (displayed above) was born.

 

This new symbol was designed using the Medical Identification Symbol as a guide. The Star of Life was registered as a certification mark with the Commissioner of Patents and Trademarks on February 1, 1977.

 

The center of the star consists of the snake and staff. The staff is named Asclepius, who according to Greek mythology, was the son of Apollo. Theory states Asclepius learned the art of healing from the centaur Cheron.. Asclepius was usually shown in a standing position with a long cloak and holding a staff with a serpent coiled around it. This is why the staff is the long-standing symbol representing medicine.  In the Physicians and Military Medical Corp, the Caduceus is used. The Caduceus is a winged staff with two serpents intertwined around it.

 

The six points of the Star of Life Symbol are meant to represent the true meaning of the EMS System. These include Detection, Reporting, Response, On Scene Care, Care in Transit, and Transfer to Definitive Care.

 

The use of the Star of Life Symbol is regulated and monitored by the NHTSA

Drivers Move Over to Promote Emergency Vehicle Safety

This is a Move Over Sign

Obey the law and Move Over

 

We have all driven up to a scene where we encounter the flashing lights of an emergency vehicle on the side of the road. Most of us, out of habit or courtesy, know to move over and slow down to ensure the safety of the emergency vehicle responder. Unfortunately, not all drivers are considerate so each state has passed their own “Move Over” laws to promote emergency vehicle safety.

Move Over laws began to pop up in the United States between 2000 and 2012 but originated in the mid 1990′s. In 1994, a paramedic in Lexington, South Carolina was struck and injured when responding to a call. To make matters worse, he was actually ticketed as “at fault” for the accident. To ensure the safety of emergency vehicle workers and protect them from liability, South Carolina passed the first form of the law in 1996. The law was later revised in 2002 to it’s current format.

Between 2000 and 2012 Move Over laws were passed in all 50 states, only Washington DC is without a regulation. Move Over laws are primarily focused on ensuring the safety of emergency responders on the side of the road. Most of the laws require passing vehicles to vacate the lane closest to the shoulder where the emergency vehicle is located. In addition to clearing the lane, many states have a provision that drivers must reduce their speed as well. Apparently not everybody is receiving this message as Hawaii, who just passed their law in 2012, wrote 60 citations in conjunction with recent DUI stops.

Since each state is responsible for their own laws the punishments can vary. Wisconsin allows for fines over $ 260 and 3 demerits against their license. In Nevada, the fines can reach $ 395 and 4 points assigned to their license. Both West Virginia and South Dakota have provisions that call for monetary fines and even jail time!

Move Over laws are in place to promote emergency vehicle safety for everyone involved. Help out the people who dedicate their lives to helping others and follow the law.

What has been your experience with Move Over laws?